Corps of Engineers prepares for upcoming rains

Published Feb. 24, 2011

As precipitation continues throughout the tri-state area, the 20 reservoirs the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio remain at low levels and are prepared to store the runoff as needed.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Emergency Operations Center is monitoring incoming storms through the region which could impact Ohio River levels and its tributaries.

“Strong storms will pass through the states of Kentucky and Indiana, over the next several days,” stated Col. Keith Landry, commander and district engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville. “These storms will leave substantial rain over a wide spread area with winds expected to gust up to 60 miles per hour.  Flooding conditions are expected throughout Kentucky and Indiana.”

The Corps has opened its emergency operations center and is monitoring river gages and contacted the state emergency operations centers in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio in preparation for the coming storms.

“A significant amount of rainfall is expected in the region. With the ground already saturated, the runoff will impact the Ohio River and its tributaries,” said Steve Rager, emergency manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville. “Although we expect to reach flood levels, the expected impacts include low-lands and agricultural areas.”

The Corps emergency operations center has issued more than 4,000 sandbags with additional sandbags on order which will be coordinated through the state emergency operations center if needed.  The Corps is partnering with the U.S. Coast Guard to monitor impacts, if any, on Ohio River navigation.

Based on National Weather Service reports, some flooding may be seen in the Cincinnati area starting Sunday evening and reach flood stages in Louisville Monday evening.

For information on river or Corps lake levels in Kentucky, Indiana, or Ohio,  contact the Corps Emergency Operations Center at 502-315-6912 or visit the website at www.lrl.usace.army.mil or www.lrl.usace.army.mil/wc/reports/lkreport.html for information on current lake levels.

Army Corps of Engineers’ reservoirs reduce flood damage by storing water for release only after high water downstream has been lowered. Without these reservoirs, lives and property would be at greater risk.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Louisville District’s lakes annually prevent approximately $215 million in flood damages.

The flood damage reduction system is designed to hold water at reservoirs on the tributaries of the Ohio River Basin.  This provides protection for communities on local streams while managing the amount of water going to the main rivers such as the Ohio River.  This system ultimately reduces crests on the Ohio River. Any release of water from the reservoirs is done in a controlled manner to prevent damages and in accordance with the design of the dam structures.


Release no. 11-003

News Releases (Hidden - Presorted LRD list)

Corps of Engineers prepares for upcoming rains

Published Feb. 24, 2011

As precipitation continues throughout the tri-state area, the 20 reservoirs the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio remain at low levels and are prepared to store the runoff as needed.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Emergency Operations Center is monitoring incoming storms through the region which could impact Ohio River levels and its tributaries.

“Strong storms will pass through the states of Kentucky and Indiana, over the next several days,” stated Col. Keith Landry, commander and district engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville. “These storms will leave substantial rain over a wide spread area with winds expected to gust up to 60 miles per hour.  Flooding conditions are expected throughout Kentucky and Indiana.”

The Corps has opened its emergency operations center and is monitoring river gages and contacted the state emergency operations centers in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio in preparation for the coming storms.

“A significant amount of rainfall is expected in the region. With the ground already saturated, the runoff will impact the Ohio River and its tributaries,” said Steve Rager, emergency manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville. “Although we expect to reach flood levels, the expected impacts include low-lands and agricultural areas.”

The Corps emergency operations center has issued more than 4,000 sandbags with additional sandbags on order which will be coordinated through the state emergency operations center if needed.  The Corps is partnering with the U.S. Coast Guard to monitor impacts, if any, on Ohio River navigation.

Based on National Weather Service reports, some flooding may be seen in the Cincinnati area starting Sunday evening and reach flood stages in Louisville Monday evening.

For information on river or Corps lake levels in Kentucky, Indiana, or Ohio,  contact the Corps Emergency Operations Center at 502-315-6912 or visit the website at www.lrl.usace.army.mil or www.lrl.usace.army.mil/wc/reports/lkreport.html for information on current lake levels.

Army Corps of Engineers’ reservoirs reduce flood damage by storing water for release only after high water downstream has been lowered. Without these reservoirs, lives and property would be at greater risk.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Louisville District’s lakes annually prevent approximately $215 million in flood damages.

The flood damage reduction system is designed to hold water at reservoirs on the tributaries of the Ohio River Basin.  This provides protection for communities on local streams while managing the amount of water going to the main rivers such as the Ohio River.  This system ultimately reduces crests on the Ohio River. Any release of water from the reservoirs is done in a controlled manner to prevent damages and in accordance with the design of the dam structures.


Release no. 11-003