Monroe Lake Reservoir nearly 100 percent full

Published May 2, 2011

Louisville, Ky. – Heavy rains have caused Monroe Lake Reservoir, near Bloomington and Bedford, Ind. to reach a pool of 555.7 feet or nearly 100 percent full today (May 2). The lake level has come up about 1.25 feet in the last 36 hours. The Monroe Lake watershed (441 square miles) received a record 11-13” of rain in April, and almost 2 additional inches in the past 36 hours, with most of this rain being held behind the Monroe Dam to reduce and prevent even worse flooding.

As part of the project’s water control plan, gate operations will be initiated when spillway elevation of 556 is reached. Releases from the project may begin later tonight (May 2). The releases are part of the original project design and lake management. The dam is structurally sound and operating as intended.

Residents along Salt Creek between Monroe Lake and Bedford can expect to see an increase of approximately 3,000 cubic feet per second, which equates to less than one foot rise in Salt Creek near Bedford. This estimate is highly dependent on local runoff downstream at Monroe Lake Damn including drainage from Clear Creek and Little Salt Creek watersheds. Residents upstream from Bedford (Guthrie Bottoms, Judah-Logan Bottoms, Peerless area, East Oolitic, west of SR 37, and downstream to the East Fork) could also be impacted as the levels of Salt Creek rise.

Monroe Lake is part of an overall system of reservoirs managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The system is designed to minimize flood damages by storing water caused by heavy rains until the rivers and streams are at levels that releases from the reservoirs will not cause additional flooding downstream.

The spillway is designed to provide a safe path for the excess flows. Then, water from the spillway re-enters downstream of the dam. Water releases are managed by Corps’ hydrology and hydraulics departments in concert with other government agencies.

The Corps coordinates with local, state and other emergency management agencies and officials to share information on current conditions at its reservoirs.

For flood information through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, visit: http://bit.ly/2011flood.

To monitor real time lake level information please visit the USGS web site at:
http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv/?site_no=03318005&agency_cd=USGS


Release no. 11-012

News Releases (Hidden - Presorted LRD list)

Monroe Lake Reservoir nearly 100 percent full

Published May 2, 2011

Louisville, Ky. – Heavy rains have caused Monroe Lake Reservoir, near Bloomington and Bedford, Ind. to reach a pool of 555.7 feet or nearly 100 percent full today (May 2). The lake level has come up about 1.25 feet in the last 36 hours. The Monroe Lake watershed (441 square miles) received a record 11-13” of rain in April, and almost 2 additional inches in the past 36 hours, with most of this rain being held behind the Monroe Dam to reduce and prevent even worse flooding.

As part of the project’s water control plan, gate operations will be initiated when spillway elevation of 556 is reached. Releases from the project may begin later tonight (May 2). The releases are part of the original project design and lake management. The dam is structurally sound and operating as intended.

Residents along Salt Creek between Monroe Lake and Bedford can expect to see an increase of approximately 3,000 cubic feet per second, which equates to less than one foot rise in Salt Creek near Bedford. This estimate is highly dependent on local runoff downstream at Monroe Lake Damn including drainage from Clear Creek and Little Salt Creek watersheds. Residents upstream from Bedford (Guthrie Bottoms, Judah-Logan Bottoms, Peerless area, East Oolitic, west of SR 37, and downstream to the East Fork) could also be impacted as the levels of Salt Creek rise.

Monroe Lake is part of an overall system of reservoirs managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The system is designed to minimize flood damages by storing water caused by heavy rains until the rivers and streams are at levels that releases from the reservoirs will not cause additional flooding downstream.

The spillway is designed to provide a safe path for the excess flows. Then, water from the spillway re-enters downstream of the dam. Water releases are managed by Corps’ hydrology and hydraulics departments in concert with other government agencies.

The Corps coordinates with local, state and other emergency management agencies and officials to share information on current conditions at its reservoirs.

For flood information through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, visit: http://bit.ly/2011flood.

To monitor real time lake level information please visit the USGS web site at:
http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv/?site_no=03318005&agency_cd=USGS


Release no. 11-012