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Natural Resource Management

In addition to the many recreation areas managed and/or leased out by the Corps of Engineers at Barren River Lake, more than 7,000 acres of land is licensed to the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources for the management of public hunting areas. The Corps also offers wildlife viewing opportunities in the Quarry Road Recreation Area with a 14 acre native prairie field and wildlife viewing trail.

Watchable Wildlife Area

The Quarry Road Watchable Wildlife Area at Barren River Lake offers visitors the opportunity to experience animals in their natural habitat. The one-mile loop trail will lead you to a secluded viewing shelter nestled at the edge of an open viewing area frequented by white-tailed deer, eastern wild turkey, cotton-tailed rabbit and eastern bluebird. Stop by the Corps of Engineer office or visit the Quarry Road Fee Station for a free viewing guide to record your encounters with the wildlife of Barren River Lake. Quarry Road Recreation Area is located off of State Highway 252 at the dam in Barren County, adjacent to the Corps of Engineers office.

Native Prairie Field at Quarry Road Recreation Area

Barren County, Ky., is part of a larger area historically known in the pioneer days as “The Barrens,” an area the Native Americans utilized to attract large game. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Ky. Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources at Barren River Lake have developed 14 acres of native warm season grasses in the Quarry Road Recreation Area to replicate the prairie fields that once dominated this area. Warm season grasses planted in this area include: big blue stem, little blue stem, switchgrass, Indian grass, and eastern gamma grass. The Quarry Road Recreation Area is located off of state highway 252 at the dam in Barren County.

Invasive Species

For information about Kentucky's exotic pest plants, you can visit the Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council online.

Kentucky's Native Alternatives to Invasive Plants