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  • May

    Louisville District Dam Safety team works hard to ensure dams are reliable

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for more than 700 dams across the United States that provide multiple benefits such as flood risk management, navigation, water supply, hydropower, environmental stewardship, fish and wildlife conservation, and recreation. Through the Dam Safety Program, USACE provides oversight for its dams and works to ensure they remain safe, reliable and able to provide their intended benefits.
  • April

    Louisville District celebrates National Volunteer Month

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Louisville District celebrates National Volunteer Month every April by recognizing the tremendous effort of the volunteers who give their time at the recreational sites in the district’s footprint. Volunteers are an essential part of delivering the district’s recreational activities.
  • December

    USACE team successfully completes miter gate repairs at Markland Locks and Dam

    For approximately two years, Markland Locks and Dam’s auxiliary chamber, in Warsaw, Kentucky, has been closed for repair. However, as of Dec. 4. 2021, the 600-foot chamber has reopened to navigation traffic. The chamber was originally closed due to an issue with the upper miter gate, and during that time all traffic continued to pass through the primary chamber. The Regional Heavy Capacity Repair Fleet has been on site at the project since August working to repair the miter gates.
  • October

    Lockmaster’s view – The McAlpine Locks and Dam

    Within the entire length of the Ohio River, there was only one place where rock reef extended across the river for a stretch of three miles – The Falls of the Ohio. This area of water was a low water slope, dropping around thirty feet over the three miles and made it practically impassable by cargo and transportation vessels in the early 1800s except when the water level was high; even then, it was treacherous. This article consists of a safety summary and a personal interview from the McAlpine Locks and Dam Lockmaster, Jay Rickman.
  • September

    Green River Lock and Dam 5 removal improves safety, enhances habitat

    A steady downpour and muddy terrain could not keep five conservation partners from celebrating the
  • Olmsted Locks and Dam sets record, replaces first wickets

    Near the confluence of the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers is where more commerce passes through than any other location on the entire U.S. inland waterways, making the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District’s Olmsted Locks and Dam one of the busiest locks in the country. More than 70 million tons of commerce passes through the Olmsted, Illinois, facility each year. Olmsted Locks and Dam is very different from the other locks and dams on the Ohio River because it is the only one with a wicket dam.