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Corps’ Cave Run Reservoir still has room for rainfall

Published April 25, 2011

Louisville, Ky. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cave Run Reservoir continues to operate safely and as intended to hold back runoff from the watershed and the Licking River to reduce flood stages downstream from the dam from storms moving through the region.

Cave Run Lake, Morehead, Ky., is currently at 754.2 feet m.s.l. (mean sea level). Flood pool level is 765 m.s.l. The reservoir continues to hold water and is using approximately 63 percent of its storage capacity as of April 25.

Rainfall and the resulting runoff from the lake’s watershed along the Licking River flow directly into the lake. Runoff is stored until the downstream river conditions allow for safe discharge. Water releases are accomplished under controlled conditions which do not cause impacts to downstream areas.

The Cave Run Lake reservoir provides flood protection benefits for the downstream areas in Rowan, Harrison, Bath and Fleming counties, Pendleton and other downstream areas.

The lake has provided more than $184 million in flood damage reduction benefits since it was built in 1974.

For information on river or Corps lake levels in Kentucky, Indiana, or Ohio, contact the Corps Emergency Operations Center at 502-315-6912 or visit the website at www.lrl.usace.army.mil or www.lrl.usace.army.mil/wc/reports/lkreport.html for information on current lake levels.

Army Corps of Engineers’ reservoirs reduce flood damage by storing water for release only after high water downstream has been lowered. Without these reservoirs, lives and property would be at greater risk.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Louisville District’s lakes annually prevent approximately $215 million in flood damages.

The flood damage reduction system is designed to hold water at reservoirs on the tributaries of the Ohio River Basin.  This provides protection for communities on local streams while managing the amount of water going to the main rivers such as the Ohio River.  This system ultimately reduces crests on the Ohio River. Any release of water from the reservoirs is done in a controlled manner to prevent damages and in accordance with the design of the dam structures.


Release no. 11-008

News Releases (Hidden - Presorted LRD list)

Corps’ Cave Run Reservoir still has room for rainfall

Published April 25, 2011

Louisville, Ky. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cave Run Reservoir continues to operate safely and as intended to hold back runoff from the watershed and the Licking River to reduce flood stages downstream from the dam from storms moving through the region.

Cave Run Lake, Morehead, Ky., is currently at 754.2 feet m.s.l. (mean sea level). Flood pool level is 765 m.s.l. The reservoir continues to hold water and is using approximately 63 percent of its storage capacity as of April 25.

Rainfall and the resulting runoff from the lake’s watershed along the Licking River flow directly into the lake. Runoff is stored until the downstream river conditions allow for safe discharge. Water releases are accomplished under controlled conditions which do not cause impacts to downstream areas.

The Cave Run Lake reservoir provides flood protection benefits for the downstream areas in Rowan, Harrison, Bath and Fleming counties, Pendleton and other downstream areas.

The lake has provided more than $184 million in flood damage reduction benefits since it was built in 1974.

For information on river or Corps lake levels in Kentucky, Indiana, or Ohio, contact the Corps Emergency Operations Center at 502-315-6912 or visit the website at www.lrl.usace.army.mil or www.lrl.usace.army.mil/wc/reports/lkreport.html for information on current lake levels.

Army Corps of Engineers’ reservoirs reduce flood damage by storing water for release only after high water downstream has been lowered. Without these reservoirs, lives and property would be at greater risk.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Louisville District’s lakes annually prevent approximately $215 million in flood damages.

The flood damage reduction system is designed to hold water at reservoirs on the tributaries of the Ohio River Basin.  This provides protection for communities on local streams while managing the amount of water going to the main rivers such as the Ohio River.  This system ultimately reduces crests on the Ohio River. Any release of water from the reservoirs is done in a controlled manner to prevent damages and in accordance with the design of the dam structures.


Release no. 11-008